The Australian Dairy Industry

The Australian Dairy industry is a busy, complex one. In fact, it’s a $13 billion farming and manufacturing export industry that deeply enriches further regional Australian industries. 6,000 dairy farmers and a further 40,000 Australians have a part to play in dairy products that are Australian made – products that are consumed to the tune of hundreds of litres per capita by Australians each year.

The ongoing demand for safe, quality dairy products creates industry and export growth, but this in turn puts pressure on farmers to create products that achieve required sanitary standards and are at the same time consistent with industry output. With growth comes an increase in risk and state and territory enforced MRL standards put hygiene and antibiotic testing at a greater priority. Losing face – or worse, creating illness – because of contaminated and unsafe product creates flow on effects for trade that can negatively impact business for farmers well beyond the initial event.

Creating a forum in which to address these issues, FoodTech Queensland – the food technology trade event debuting in June this year – will showcase exhibitors with workable solutions for problems surrounding farming, growth, and the dairy industry. Along with an array of plant, equipment, and food processing facilities, there will be a range of exhibitors featuring ground-breaking technologies designed to streamline and enhance production processes.

One of these exhibitors is Flo-gineering, distributor for Charm Sciences – largely considered the leading global provider of food safety, water quality and environmental diagnostics equipment. Flo-gineering are leading a charge towards the development of a uniform program within Australia to screen bulk tank milk for mycotoxins and the most common antibiotics, tested at farm or dairy stations before unloaded from trucks into silos. The tests provide a lower incidence of false positive test results when compared to other products, and the speed of the testing ensures the dairy industry can lower operating costs by receiving milk faster, moving tankers more quickly, and expediting production of a safe, wholesome, and quality product.

Not just a relief for the industry, solutions such as these are a great result for the end consumer who, although largely unaware, will benefit from reduced incidences of health issues associated with improper detection of antibiotics.

Flo-gineering is just one example of industry innovation on display at FoodTech QLD, the event’s purpose is not just to encourage growth and development in industries such as dairy, but to provide strategic and valuable support through showcasing the best technology and solutions currently available.